The strongest symbols are often also the simplest. ANAHITA: “Our Daily Lives” collection. Oat & Glyxias

“Though heartless and helpless I am,
I am devoted to your love.
Too many shackles I have broken,
and hence I’m intoxicated.
In the House of Wonders,
I bear a mundane life, sweetheart
and you know how I came to be intoxicated.
Come to me my sweetheart,
don’t bother me any longer my smiling sweetheart,
for I’m intoxicated.”


Anahita Taghavi, dentist, musician, dancer and artist from Iran

This headdress is one of the simplest looking pieces in the collection, as it contains less plant material than usual. But it’s one of the ones I’ve enjoyed designing the most. It has preserved red oat flakes, white dried glyxias, wires and floral ribbon. Its design is made up of 7 lines that come out of the same centre and open in the shape of a fan. As if they were rays of the sun.My idea was to design a spectacular flower headdress with as few flowers as possible. And strong enough to withstand the movement of a dance.

My idea was to design a spectacular flower headdress with as few flowers as possible. And strong enough to withstand the movement of a dance.

Photo: Ernst Lalleman (www.ernstlalleman.com)
Model: Anahita Taghavi, dentist, musician, dancer and artist from Iran
Dress & hair: Elahe Parsa (www.eleepdesign.com)
Floral design: Ritaflowers

The pointed shapes of the oat kernels and their strong red colour help to achieve this spectacular touch. If instead of using such spiky shapes I had only used round flowers, the final effect would have been quite different. Moreover, by only placing the flowers at the end of each line, we also increase this sensation. On the other hand, the lower part of each line is painted in a dark silver colour, to highlight the red colour of the ends.

The crown is firmly attached to the hair by means of two overlapping combs. It can withstand almost any movement. Even that of a Sufi dance like the one Anahita Taghavi danced in the Plaça Joan Coromines, next to the Barcelona Museum of Contemporary Art (MACBA) to present this design. The movements of her hypnotic Sufi-style dance, accompanied by the sound of her smooth voice and the percussive rhythms of the daff, which she also plays, take us to a dreamlike world of colours and shapes. And they also turn Anahita into a source of light. In Sufi dance, the dervishes link infinite turns endlessly: It is a dance linked to the rotational movement of the planets of the solar system and to the connection with God.

Video+sound: Ernst Lalleman (www.ernstlalleman.com)
Dancer + daff percussion: Anahita Taghavi, dentist, musician, dancer and artist from Iran
Dress & hair: Elahe Parsa (www.eleepdesign.com)
Floral design: Ritaflowers

Throughout the design process of this floral headdress I was able to corroborate once again the paradox of how simplicity is also complex to achieve. And this can happen with things as apparently disparate as floral design, dance, graphic design, gastronomy or any form of sport.

The strongest symbols are often also the simplest. There is nothing casual about it.

Graphic designers always advise that “you should design with an eraser“. And Mies van der Rohe, the famous German architect, was in favour of “less is more“. According to Nicholas Burroughs, “Minimalism is not the lack of something, it is simply the perfect amount of something“. Until one day, while reading about web design, I discovered that there is also a sacred rule for maximum usability of any website: “When you add something (in web design), you lose something“. Thus, web designers often consider that “the only way to get something simple and usable is to remove something every time you add something“.

To design a floral accessory with simplicity, I recommend that you first reflect and be clear about what you want to convey with the final design. And once you have this clear, you have to be able to materialise what you have in your mind in a clear and concise way. If the final design of a floral wreath is too complicated, it is usually because you may have used elements or shapes that are too complicated. And you may also find that it won’t be easy to combine this floral crown with the rest of the outfits or accessories you want to wear at the same time.

Photo: Ernst Lalleman (www.ernstlalleman.com)
Model: Anahita Taghavi, dentist, musician, dancer and artist from Iran
Dress & hair: Elahe Parsa (www.eleepdesign.com)
Floral design: Ritaflowers

A simple design is usually easier to use and recognise. It will also usually be easier to maintain, keep and will last longer.

Empowering and nurturing our creativity will help us to make our designs better and better. And above all, it frees up our critical thinking when we set out to do things differently from the way we have been doing them until now. On the other hand, we can also create beautiful things, as well as solve unsolved problems. Don’t you think it’s at least worth a try?

Clarity of ideas will lead you to good design. In life and in floral design. That’s where the magic lies.

This tiara of preserved flowers is available for sale and shipment anywhere in the world. Just contact me.

And if you want to discover the benefits of floral design and put them into practice with a personalised workshop, you can find out more here.

Do you have any questions or comments? Contact me, I am happy to hear from you.

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